Writing Introduction For Assignments Afi

The working title for this film was MASH , without the asterisks between the letters. M*A*S*H, which is an acronym for Mobile Auxiliary Surgical Hospital, opens with a written prologue that includes a section of General Douglas MacArthur’s famous 1951 farewell address to the United States Congress after he was relieved of duty in Korea and the quote from Dwight D. Eisenhower, "I will go to Korea," a campaign promise made during his successful bid for president that same year.
       The opening title sequence shows a line of helicopters returning from the battlefield to the 4077th MASH unit with wounded soldiers strapped to each side. In the closing credits, the cast’s names, rather than being written onscreen, are recited by actor David Arkin as “Sgt. Maj. Volmer” over footage of their respective characters. At the close of the film, Volmer announces that M*A*S*H was that night’s film and invites the audience to “follow . . . combat surgeons . . . operating as bombs and bullets burst around them, snatching laughs and loves between amputations and penicillin.”
       Dr. H. Richard Hornberger wrote the novel MASH, upon which the film was based, as a fictional account of his experience as a Korean War Army surgeon. According to a 24 Nov 1997 People article, Hornberger, who wrote under the pen name Richard Hooker, had conservative, Republican political views that differed greatly from the liberal-leaning film and subsequent television series based on the book.
       As noted in a 12 Jul 1968 DV article, Twentieth Century-Fox purchased the film rights from Hornberger several months before the book’s publication and assigned the film to producer Ingo Preminger, as his first feature film producing effort. A 16 Jul 1968 HR article noted that Fox signed Ring Lardner, Jr. to write the screenplay. However, in a documentary included as added content on the 2001 DVD release of the film, Preminger claimed that Lardner had been asked to read the galleys for the book and then presented the idea to him.
       By early January 1969, Fox hired Robert Altman as director. After Fox cast rising stars Elliott Gould and Donald Sutherland in Mar 1969, Altman choose the remaining cast from actors with whom he had worked previously, including Michael Murphy and Tom Skerritt, and from various theater groups, among them, the American Conservatory Theatre and the comedy groups Second City in Chicago and The Committee in San Francisco. The production began on 14 Apr 1969 at the Twentieth Century-Fox Ranch in Malibu, CA, with the Japanese golfing scene shot at a nearby golf course, and the Kokura, Japan street scenes shot on Fox’s back lot.
       In the director’s commentary included as added content to the DVD, Altman stated that he preferred the ranch’s isolated location, which encouraged Fox to concentrate their attentions on their high-budget war films in production at the time, Tora! Tora! Tora! and Patton (see below). Altman thought that by keeping quiet and under budget he would be able to exercise more unrestricted creative freedom to develop the politically charged film. Unlike many war films about World War I and World War II, M*A*S*H did not make specific references to battles or dates in the Korean War, so that the film could be an allegory for America’s then current involvement in the Vietnam War.
       According to an 8 Mar 1970 LAT article, Altman used a zoom lens and a fog filter to obtain the camp’s “dirty” look, an aesthetic which at first displeased the studio. In the 18 Feb 1970 LAT review, Altman noted that the film was shot mostly with a long lens to allow the actors to play one to another, rather than directly to the camera, thus enhancing dialogue authenticity. The director also allowed everyone in the cast to view the film dailies, a practice not regularly allowed by the studio.
       The ensemble cast largely improvised dialogue from Lardner’s basic script and scene structure. For example, actress Sally Kellerman noted, in a 22 May 1970 Entertainment World article, that the original role written for her character “Hot Lips” contained only a few lines from which she created a main character. Because Fox refused to hire many non-speaking extras, Altman, who wanted a bustling camp atmosphere, was forced to create at least one line for each person who appeared onscreen.
       Altman’s alterations to the original script and his creation of substantial roles for lesser known actors became points of contention during and after the production. In a 29 Jul 1997 NYT letter to the editor, Altman denied Lardner’s earlier claims that the director had rewritten the script and thus ruined the film, and explained that the film was an improvisation stemming from Lardner’s structure. In the 2001 DVD documentary, Lardner addressed comments he had made throughout the years regarding Altman altering his script, noting that, upon Altman’s request, he made rewrites to the script, but the director largely ignored these changes. Also on the DVD documentary, Gould stated that he had made a mistake when, during shooting, he asked the studio to fire Altman. According to an 18 Jan 2002 LAT article, unknown to Altman, Gould and Sutherland had asked Fox to fire the director during production because of his insistence on treating bit players with the same consideration as the stars.
       As noted in a 15 Jul 1979 NYT article, Altman’s trademark layering of various sound components was central to M*A*S*H’s chaotic, front-line atmosphere. According to the DVD documentary, Altman conceived of and recorded the frequent loudspeaker announcements during editing to use as transitional devices for the film. The director used overlapping dialogue and punctuated the film with the announcements and an English-language, Japanese radio show broadcast over a loudspeaker. The announcements listed mundane base restrictions and descriptions of the evening film screenings, including military films glorifying war, thus serving to highlight the film’s theme of the hypocrisy of saving lives as the war continued to create more victims. The radio station often played songs that ironically underscored the film’s plot. For example a Japanese version of the song “My Blue Heaven” is heard during a love scene and the uptempo “Sayonara,” which included the lyrics “I knew sometime we’d have to say sayonara” [the Japanese word for goodbye], is heard while “Frank Burns” is being driven away in a straight jacket.
       Altman’s thirteen-year-old son Michael wrote the lyrics for the film’s theme song, “Suicide Is Painless.” Although the singers for the opening credits version of the song have not been determined, the ballad version heard during “Painless Pole”’s mock suicide ceremony is performed by actor Ken Prymus as “Private Seidman.” Technical advisor Dr. David Sachs helped to create the bloody and authentic front line operations for which the film was both criticized and lauded. Sachs also had a minor role as a surgeon in the film. According to a 1 May 1969 DV article, a helicopter crash during production at the ranch resulted in injuries to pilot Van L. Honeycutt and stuntmen John Ashby and Eddie Smith, who were portraying injured soldiers strapped to the side of the helicopter. According to the director’s commentary, Altman then used this wreckage in subsequent scenes, including a sunbathing sequence near the landing area.
       Several National Football League players were featured in the film, including Buck Buchanan, Timothy Brown and Oakland Raiders and Kansas City Chiefs star Fred Williamson, who had previously acted on television but made his motion picture debut in M*A*S*H . Williamson, as “Oliver ‘Spearkchucker’ Jones,” leads the 4077th football team to victory. According to a 12 Jun 1970 HR news item, ABC Sports director Andy Sidaris sued Fox for failing to credit him for directing the football sequences in the film; however, the outcome of this dispute and the extent of Sidaris’ work on the film remains undetermined.
       The popular, irreverent black comedy and anti-war film M*A*S*H became the second top grossing film in 1970, earning $22,000,000; however, according to a 24 May 1970 NYT article, several feminist groups criticized it for portraying women as merely sexual objects to be humiliated or patronized. Altman noted in the DVD director’s commentary that he portrayed the misogynistic attitudes because they were the real conditions for females working the military at the time.
       According to a 17 Mar 1970 HR news item, the United States Army and Air Force banned the film from being screened on service installations because it “reflected unfavorably” on the military. On 1 Apr 1970, HR reported that the Defense Department reversed its decision. Modern sources have speculated that the reversal was caused by the fact that many soldiers watched the film off base.
       M*A*S*H won an Oscar for Best Screenplay (Lardner) and received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Supporting Actress (Kellerman), Best Directing, Best Film Editing and Best Picture. The film also gained international fame when it won the 1970 International Grand Prix of the Cannes Film Festival.
       The film was adapted into the television series M*A*S*H (CBS, Sep 1972--Sep 1983), an extremely popular comedy starring Alan Alda as "Hawkeye" and Loretta Switt as "Hot Lips." Gary Berghoff as "Radar" was the only actor from the film to continue with the series. Hawkeye's roommate and co-conspirator "Trapper John," a part originally played by Wayne Rogers on the series, was changed to "B. J. Hunnicut," played by Mike Farrell, after Rogers left the program in 1975. Although still set during the Korean War, the series had an anti-war sentiment initially directed at the Vietnam War, from which American troops were not withdrawn until 1973.
       In Sep 1979, CBS aired the television series Trapper John, M.D. , a portrait of the character from the television series working as a chief surgeon at a San Francisco hospital twenty-eight years after his return from Korea. At the close of the television series M*A*S*H in 1983, several cast members, including Harry Morgan as Dr. Sherman Potter , Jamie Farr as "Max Klinger" and William Christopher as “Father Francis Mulcahy,” starred in AfterMASH (CBS, Sep 1983-Dec 1984), a dramatic series about civilian life in a veteran's hospital after the Korean War. Gould and Sutherland appeared in the 1971 Little Murders , in which Gould starred, and were cast as a comedic team in the 1974 film S*P*Y*S .
       In 2007, M*A*S*H was ranked 54th on AFI's 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films, moving up from the 56th position it held on AFI's 1997 list.MoreLess

Box Office

2 Feb 1970.

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Daily Variety

7 Jan 1969.

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Daily Variety

20 Jan 1969.

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Daily Variety

12 Mar 1969.

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Daily Variety

1 May 1969.

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Daily Variety

9 May 1969.

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Daily Variety

12 Jul 1968.

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Daily Variety

19 Jan 1970.

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Daily Variety

12 Jun 1970.

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Entertainment World

22 May 1970.

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Film Daily

21 Jan 1970

p. 7.

Films and Filming

Aug 1970.

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Hollywood Reporter

16 Jul 1968.

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Hollywood Reporter

21 Mar 1969.

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Hollywood Reporter

31 Mar 1969.

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Hollywood Reporter

11 Apr 1969

p. 11.

Hollywood Reporter

14 Apr 1969.

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Hollywood Reporter

13 Jun 1969

p. 32.

Hollywood Reporter

16 Jul 1969.

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Hollywood Reporter

20 Jan 1970

pp. 3-4.

Hollywood Reporter

17 Mar 1970.

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Hollywood Reporter

1 Apr 1970.

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Los Angeles Times

18 Feb 1970.

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Los Angeles Times

8 Mar 1970.

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Los Angeles Times

17 May 1970.

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Los Angeles Times

18 Jan 2002.

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Motion Picture Herald

28 Jan 1970.

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New Republic

31 Jan 1970

pp. 30-31.

New York Times

26 Jan 1970

p. 26.

New York Times

1 Feb 1970

Section II, p. 1.

New York Times

22 Mar 1970

Section II, p. 19.

New York Times

24 May 1970.

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New York Times

7 Feb 1971.

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New York Times

29 Jun 1997.

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New Yorker

24 Jan 1970

p. 74.

Newsweek

2 Feb 1970

p. 83.

Saturday Review

31 Jan 1970.

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The Exhibitor

4 Feb 1970.

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Variety

21 Jan 1970

p. 18.

[Docs] [txt|pdf] [draft-gray-rfc1...] [Tracker] [Diff1] [Diff2]

PROPOSED STANDARD

Network Working Group E. Gray Request for Comments: 4548 J. Rutemiller Updates: 1888, 4048 Ericsson Category: Standards Track G. Swallow Cisco Systems, Inc. May 2006 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments for NSAP Addresses Status of This Memo This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. Copyright Notice Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006). Abstract This document is intended to accomplish two highly inter-related tasks: to establish an "initial" Internet Code Point (ICP) assignment for each of IPv4 and IPv6 address encoding in Network Service Access Point (NSAP) Addresses, and to recommend an IANA assignment policy for currently unassigned ICP values. In the first task, this document is a partial replacement for RFC 1888 -- particularly for section 6 of RFC 1888. In the second task, this document incorporates wording and specifications from ITU-T Recommendation X.213 and further recommends that IANA use the "IETF consensus" assignment policy in making future ICP assignments. Table of Contents 1. Introduction ....................................................21.1. Conventions ................................................21.2. Acronyms and Terminology ...................................32. IANA Considerations .............................................33. Initial Allocations and Uses ....................................43.1. IPv4 Address Encoding in an NSAPA ..........................43.2. IPv6 Address Encoding in an NSAPA ..........................54. Security Considerations .........................................65. References ......................................................75.1. Normative References .......................................75.2. Informative References .....................................7Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 1]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 20061. IntroductionSection 6 of RFC 1888 [1888] previously provided for assignment of the initial Internet Code Point (ICP) value '0' for encoding an IPv6 address in a Network Service Access (or Attachment) Point [NSAP] address. RFC 1888 also defined multiple means for restricted encoding of an NSAP address in an IPv6 address. The means RFC 1888 defined for encoding NSAP addresses in IPv6 address format was heavily annotated with warnings and limitations that apply should this encoding be used. Possibly as a result, these encodings are not used and appear never to have been used in any IPv6 deployment. In addition, section 6 contains minor errors. As a result of these various considerations, RFC 1888 [1888] has been obsoleted and declared Historic by RFC 4048 [4048]. It is the belief of the authors of this document that the errors in section 6 of RFC 1888 resulted -- at least in part -- because the ITU-T specification [X.213] that originally assigned Authority and Format Identifier (AFI) '35' to IANA was not freely publicized, nor was it incorporated or explained using the mechanism commonly used in the IETF, i.e., an RFC. It is therefore part of the purpose of this document to provide that explanation. In addition, because there are other documents that refer to the IPv6 ICP assignment in RFC 1888, it is necessary for the errors in section6 of RFC 1888 to be corrected, irrespective of the RFC's ultimate status. Finally, no previous RFC (including RFC 1888) has ever formalized an assignment of an IPv4 ICP. This may have been in part because of a lack of formal definition of an IANA assignment policy for ICP values under the IANA-allocated AFI ('35'). This document replaces section 6 of RFC 1888 in defining the ICP for IPv6 address encoding in an NSAP address, and it formalizes the ICP assignment for IPv4 address encoding in an NSAP address. 1.1. Conventions The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [2119]. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 2]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 20061.2. Acronyms and Terminology AFI - Authority and Format Identifier BCD - Binary Coded Decimal DSP - Domain Specific Part IANA - Internet Assigned Numbers Authority ICP - Internet Code Point IDI - Initial Domain Identifier IDP - Initial Domain Part IETF - Internet Engineering Task Force ISO - International Organization for Standardization NSAP - Network Service Access (or Attachment) Point (often NSAPA) NSAPA - NSAP Address; 20-Octet Address Format OSI - Open Systems Interconnection RFC - Request For Comments WIP - Work In Progress 2. IANA Considerations An ITU-T Recommendation [X.213] has allocated two AFIs designating IANA as the assignment authority. One of these two AFIs ('34') is allocated for assignment of NSAPA in Decimal Numeric Format. This document does not address allocation for this AFI as it is not clear what use (if any) can be made of this encoding format at this time. The other AFI ('35') is to be used for binary encoding except as noted below. The NSAPA format consists of an Initial Domain Part (IDP) and Domain Specific Part (DSP). The IDP, in turn, consists of an Authority and Format Identifier (AFI) and an Initial Domain Identifier (IDI). The AFI is defined to be a binary octet, and the IDI is defined to be a four decimal digit number encoded in two octets using Binary Coded Decimal format. Each nibble of the IDI is used to represent a decimal digit, using binary value '0000' through '1001'. In assigning allocation authority for AFI '35' to IANA, the ITU-T Recommendation [X.213] specifies that the two-octet IDI will be used to hold an Internet Code Point (ICP) that, because of the decimal encoding, MUST be in the decimal range from '0' to '9999'. The ITU-T recommendation assumes the assignment of ICP '0' (zero) for IPv6 address encoding in a Network Service Access Point Address (NSAPA, or often NSAP). In addition, ITU-T assumed that IANA would assign an ICP for IPv4 address encoding in an NSAPA and X.213 assumed that the ICP value for this purpose would be '1'. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 3]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 2006 In an NSAPA, the DSP is the remaining octets after the IDP. For AFI '35', this is 17 octets having a format as defined by IANA or as defined by another party and published with IANA consent. IANA, as the authority responsible for AFI '35', SHOULD NOT assign an ICP unless there is a corresponding defined, and published, format at the time of the code point assignment. The IANA has assigned the following ICP values: ICP Value Address Encoding Format Definition ---------- ----------------- ---------------------------- '0' IPv6 RFC 4548, section 3.2 '1' IPv4 RFC 4548, section 3.1 Remaining decimal values '2' through '9999' MUST be assigned on an IETF consensus basis [2434]. 3. Initial Allocations and Uses This document continues the ICP assignment and format definition as previously defined in RFC 1888, and it formalizes the allocation of ICP value '1' for IPv4 encoding and the format to be used. The sections below describe the specific IPv4 and IPv6 address encoding formats. 3.1. IPv4 Address Encoding in an NSAPA If it is required, for whatever reason, to embed an IPv4 address inside a 20-octet NSAP address, then the following format MUST be used. Note: alignment is an artifact of existing NSAPA usage. A specific possible use of this embedding is to express an IP address within the ATM Forum address format. Another possible use would be to allow Connectionless Network Protocol (CLNP) packets that encapsulate IPv4 packets to be routed in a CLNP network using the IPv4 address architecture. Several leading octets of the IPv4 address could be used as a CLNP routing prefix. An NSAPA with an AFI value of '35' and an ICP value of '1' (one) encodes a 4-octet IPv4 address in the first 4 octets of the DSP. The last 13 octets of the DSP are unspecified in this document. To maintain compatibility with both NSAP format and IPv4 addressing, these octets MUST be present, but have no intrinsic significance for IPv4. The default values for the unspecified octets is zero. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 4]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 2006 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 0-3 | AFI = 0x35 | ICP = 0001 | IPv4 (octet 0)| +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 4-7 | IPv4 (octets 1-3) | | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 8-11 | | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 12-15| | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 16-19| | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ An NSAPA with the IANA AFI code and ICP set to '1' (one) is converted to an IPv4 address by stripping off the first 3 and the last 13 octets. If the NSAP-addressed contents are passed to a higher layer, the last 13 octets SHOULD be presented to the higher layer as well. If an NSAP address using this encoding is used for routing in an IPv4 routing architecture, only the 4-octet IPv4 address MAY be considered. 3.2. IPv6 Address Encoding in an NSAPA If it is required, for whatever reason, to embed an IPv6 address inside a 20-octet NSAP address, then the following format MUST be used. Note: alignment is an artifact of existing NSAPA usage. A specific possible use of this embedding is to express an IP address within the ATM Forum address format. Another possible use would be to allow CLNP packets that encapsulate IPv6 packets to be routed in a CLNP network using the IPv6 address architecture. Several leading octets of the IPv6 address could be used as a CLNP routing prefix. An NSAPA with an AFI value of '35' and an ICP value of '0' (zero) encodes a 16-octet IPv6 address in the first 16 octets of the DSP. The last octet of the DSP is a selector. To maintain compatibility with both NSAP format and IPv6 addressing, this octet MUST be present, but it has no intrinsic significance for IPv6. Its default value is zero, but other values may be used as specified for any specific application. For example, this octet may be used to specify one of 255 possible port numbers. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 5]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 2006 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 0-3 | AFI = 0x35 | ICP = 0000 | IPv6 (octet 0)| +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 4-7 | IPv6 (octets 1-4) | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 8-11 | IPv6 (octets 5-8) | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 12-15| IPv6 (octets 9-12) | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 16-19| IPv6 (octets 13-15) | | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ An NSAPA with the IANA AFI code and ICP set to '0' (zero) is converted to an IPv6 address by stripping off the first 3 octets and the 20th octet. If the NSAP-addressed contents are passed to a higher layer, the last octet SHOULD be presented to the higher layer as well. If an NSAP address using this encoding is used for routing in an IPv6 routing architecture, only the 16-octet IPv6 address MAY be considered. 4. Security Considerations The NSAP encoding of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses is compatible with the corresponding security mechanisms of RFC 4301 [4301], hence this document introduces no new security exposure in the Internet. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 6]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 20065. References5.1. Normative References [4301] Kent, S. and K. Seo, "Security Architecture for the Internet Protocol", RFC 4301, December 2005. [2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. [NSAP] International Organization for Standardization, "Information technology - Open Systems Interconnection - Network service Definition", ISO/IEC 8348:2002, 2002. [X.213] ITU-T Recommendation X.213, X-Series Recommendations, Data Networks and Open Systems Communications, October, 2001. [2434] Narten, T. and H. Alvestrand, "Guidelines for Writing an IANA Considerations Section in RFCs", BCP 26, RFC 2434, October 1998. 5.2. Informative References [1888] Bound, J., Carpenter, B., Harrington, D., Houldsworth, J., and A. Lloyd, "OSI NSAPs and IPv6", RFC 1888, August 1996. [4048] Carpenter, B., "RFC 1888 Is Obsolete", RFC 4048, April 2005. Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 7]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 2006 Authors' Addresses Eric Gray Ericsson 900 Chelmsford Street Lowell, MA, 01851 EMail: Eric.Gray@Marconi.com John Rutemiller Ericsson 3000 Marconi Drive Warrendale, PA, 15086-7502 EMail: John.Rutemiller@Marconi.com George Swallow Cisco Systems, Inc. 1414 Massachusetts Avenue Boxborough, MA, 01719 EMail: swallow@cisco.com Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 8]
RFC 4548 Internet Code Point (ICP) Assignments May 2006 Full Copyright Statement Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006). This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their rights. This document and the information contained herein are provided on an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Intellectual Property The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in this document or the extent to which any license under such rights might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has made any independent effort to identify any such rights. Information on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be found in BCP 78 and BCP 79. Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at http://www.ietf.org/ipr. The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement this standard. Please address the information to the IETF at ietf-ipr@ietf.org. Acknowledgement Funding for the RFC Editor function is provided by the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA). Gray, et al. Standards Track [Page 9]
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