Broadening Assignments Examples Of Simile

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind. A simile is one of the most common forms of figurative language. Similes can be found just about anywhere from poems to song lyrics and even in everyday conversations.

Similes and metaphors are often confused with one another. The main difference between a simile and metaphor is that a simile uses the words "like" or "as" to draw a comparison and a metaphor simply states the comparison without using "like" or "as". An example of a simile is: She is as innocent as an angel. An example of a metaphor is: She is an angel.

Similes in Everyday Language

Similes are used in literature to make writing more vivid and powerful. In everyday speech they can be used to convey meaning quickly and effectively, as many commonly used expressions are similes. For example, when someone says “He is as busy as a bee,” it means he is working hard, as bees are known to be extremely busy. If someone says "I am as snug as a bug in a rug," they mean that they feel very comfortable and cozy or are tucked up tight in bed.

Some other well-known similes you will often hear are:

  • As cute as a kitten
  • As happy as a clam
  • As light as a feather
  • As blind as a bat
  • As bold as brass
  • As bright as a button
  • As shiny as a new pin
  • As cold as ice
  • As common as dirt
  • As cool as a cucumber
  • As hard as nails
  • As hot as hell
  • As innocent as a lamb
  • As tall as a giraffe
  • As tough as nails
  • As white as a ghost
  • As sweet as sugar
  • As black as coal

As with a lot of figurative language, when talking to someone from another region or who's not speaking in their native language they might not get the meaning of many similes.

Similes Add Depth to Language

Similes can make our language more descriptive and enjoyable. Writers, poets, and songwriters make use of similes often to add depth and emphasize what they are trying to convey to the reader or listener. Similes can be funny, serious, mean, or creative.

Following are some more examples of similes regularly used in writing:

  • You were as brave as a lion.
  • They fought like cats and dogs.
  • He is as funny as a barrel of monkeys.
  • This house is as clean as a whistle.
  • He is as strong as an ox.
  • Your explanation is as clear as mud.
  • Watching the show was like watching grass grow.
  • That is as easy as shooting fish in a barrel.
  • This contract is as solid as the ground we stand on.
  • That guy is as nutty as a fruitcake.
  • Don’t just sit there like a bump on a log.
  • Well, that went over like a lead balloon.
  • They are as different as night and day.
  • She is as thin as a rake.
  • Last night, I slept like a log.
  • This dress is perfect because it fits like a glove.
  • They wore jeans, which made me stand out like a sore thumb.
  • My love for you is as deep as the ocean.
  • I am so thirsty that my throat is as dry as a bone.

Examples of similes can be seen in classic literature, such as in the poem "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns:

O my Luve is like a red, red rose
That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve is like the melody
That’s sweetly played in tune.

Another example of a simile can be found in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. When Romeo talks to Mercutio before the Capulets' party, he makes the following comparison about love:

"Is love a tender thing? It is too rough, too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn."

Similes can often be found in song lyrics, as they let you convey deeper meaning with fewer words. For example:

  • "My heart is like an open highway." - "It's My Life," Bon Jovi
  • "It’s been a hard days night, and I've been working like a dog." - "A Hard Day's Night," The Beatles
  • "And it seems to me you lived your life, Like a candle in the wind." - "Candle in the Wind," Elton John
  • "You're as cold as ice." - "Cold As Ice," Foreigner
  • "Steady as a preacher, Free as a weed" - "American Honey," Lady Antebellum

You can even find similes in popular ads and company slogans such as:

  • Chevrolet: "Built Like A Rock"
  • Doritos: "Tastes Like Awesome Feels"
  • State Farm: "Like A Good Neighbor"
  • Almond Joy / Mounds: "Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't."
  • Honda: "The Honda's ride is as smooth as a gazelle in the Sahara. It's comfort is like a hug from Nana."

Get Creative with Similes

Similes are a great tool to use in creative language and are fun to come up with. They not only make what you are writing or saying more interesting, but they can often intrigue the reader as well. When creating your own similes, watch out for cliches though and try to go beyond the obvious comparisons.

For more examples, check out our Simile Flashcards or fun list of similes at  Simile Examples for Kids.

Do you have a good example to share? Add your example here.

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Examples of Similes

By YourDictionary

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind. A simile is one of the most common forms of figurative language. Similes can be found just about anywhere from poems to song lyrics and even in everyday conversations. Similes and metaphors are often confused with one another. The main difference between a simile and metaphor is that a simile uses the words "like" or "as" to draw a comparison and a metaphor simply states the comparison without using "like" or "as". An example of a simile is: She is as innocent as an angel. An example of a metaphor is: She is an angel.

Soldiers –

One of the initiatives I am working on for our enlisted Soldiers is talent management. Broadening comes up in almost every conversation I have with Soldiers and leaders when I talk with them about managing talent in our force.

‘Broadening’ is a term that we use all the time in these conversations, but I find Soldiers and leaders use the term to mean all kinds of assignments, duty positions, education, and fellowships. You name it and ‘broadening’ is probably used to categorize it.

All these conversations intrigued me, and led me to consider how the Army truly defines broadening. In ADRP 6-22, “Broadening consists of those education and training opportunities, assignments, and experiences that provide exposure outside the leader’s branch or functional area competencies.” This definition explains why broadening means all kinds of things to Soldiers and leaders. My first thought was, we need to refine this definition so our Soldiers and leaders will be properly aligned with where the Army is headed by identifying knowledge, skills, and attributes or KSAs.

The future Army will manage talent better by assigning and selecting Soldiers for opportunities using a holistic approach including KSAs. Broadening opportunities are crucial in developing leaders with a wider range of experiences and skills who can operate in ever-changing global environments. Officers refined their perspective of broadening for their cohort in DA PAM 600-3, Commissioned Officer Professional Development and Career Management. I think it’s time to update the broadening concept for enlisted Soldiers in DA PAM 600-25, U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Guide.

Here’s the definition we have developed for broadening, “the purposeful expansion of a NCO’s core MOS proficiency and leadership, provided through developmental assignments, education, training, and other opportunities both within and outside their career management field, resulting in agile and adaptive leaders capable of operating in complex environments.” Examples of developmental assignments are Joint, NATO, Drill Sergeant, Recruiter, AIT Platoon Sergeant, Instructor, ROTC, and IG. Fellowships with degree completion, attending other DOD leadership academies, and professional reading are examples of the education component to broadening. Training with industry, credentialed functional training, and training in joint and multinational environments broadens Soldiers.

Other opportunities for broadening are experiences working in Joint Interagency Intergovernmental and Multinational environments, working as a Defense Attaché, the White House Transportation Agency, selection or working with Special Operations forces, and any other future opportunities not currently available. The four components (developmental assignments, education, training, and other opportunities) all lead toward agile and adaptive leaders capable of operating anywhere in the world.

Your talents and attributes are the most important combat multiplier our Army and nation can rely on. It is imperative we identify your talents, develop them, and optimize them for our nation’s national security, the future of our force, and for the future of our society as you become veterans employing your talents in the civilian workforce.

Check out this link on HRC’s site that has more information about broadening opportunities. Be sure to click on the program catalog with descriptions about 21 different broadening opportunities including a White House Fellowship and Training with Industry opportunities.

Victory Starts Here!

– CSM D

Tags: Army, Broadening, INCOPD, NCO, NCO 2020, Soldier, Soldiers, TRADOC, TRADOC CSM, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

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