Arck Systems Case Study Solution

...arenas such as Mice, Webcam, and Remotes. In order to fully understand Logitech’s success it is important to understand their strategy for growing but also their strategy for the issues they have faced. And ultimately deciding what will be their competitive advantage in the future. In order to understand the strategy of Logitech is it imperative to conduct a brief external analysis, beginning with the general environment. The general environment focuses on demographic, economic, political/ legal, socio- cultural, technological, geographic, and physical environmental trends. These trends help analyze what the next strategic moves should be. In Logitech’s case it is crucial for them to analyze all seven trends but focus on the technological trends. Next, an industry analysis needs to be done in order to gain an idea of what kinds of competitive forces the industry will face. These forces are based off of five criteria: threat of new entrants, bargaining power of buyers, bargaining power of suppliers, threat of new substitutes, and rivalry among existing competitors. The third step in conducting an external analysis is understanding the competitor’s objectives, strategies, and their capabilities. Logitech realized early on whom its competitors were, Creative Technology Ltd., Microsoft Corporation, and Royal Philips Electronics, and was able to differentiate its products from them. Strategy is a set of commitments and...

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Arck Systems Case

...Arck Systems Case 1. A number of elements in the two companies’ compensation plans are different. Which of these differences should most concern Bryan Mynor? Explain The following elements in the compensation plans are different between Lux Software and Arck: * Base Pay (They both receive base pay, but it is almost double the amount the sales representatives receive at Arck than the representatives at Lux Software); * Quota (The representatives at Lux Software must reach sales worth $100.000 dollars per quarter, at Arck on the other hand they must reach sales worth $1.000.000 per year); * Sales commission (At Lux Software the representatives receive 4%, while at Arck they receive 9%); * Cap (A Cap is the sales level after which a salesperson will not make commission on further sales. This doesn’t exist at Lux Software and with Arck the limit is $6.000.000 in sales per year). * Other bonus (There are no other bonuses at Lux Software, while if you reach the cap at Arck the representatives get a $50.000 bonus). The most important difference for Bryan Mynor is probably the sales commission with a focus on the accelerators. Because of the accelerators the payroll is stretched out a lot. For instance, the difference in payroll between the 1st and 10th percentile is $2.8mn. 2. In a table compare the following characteristics of a Lux’s Sales Rep and an Arck’s Sales Rep: product sold Profit Margin, Sales Nature (which is more technical and......

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Barco Projection Systems Case Study

...Part-time International MBA 2007-2008 Assignment Marketing Barco Case Prof. Dr. ir. Marion Debruyne Michel Defloor Kristof Geilenkotten Mark Veugelers Nathan Vastesaeger Wim Van de Velde Barco Projection Systems Division Content Table 1. Brief diagnosis and definition of the main problem 2. Analysis of the main problem 3. Recommendations and justifications a. Product development plans b. Pricing of current products c. Pricing strategy in light of BG800 launch d. Summary 4. References 5. Exhibit 1 6. Exhibit 2 Page 2 of 8 Barco Projection Systems Division 1. Brief diagnosis and definition of the main problem Based on Barco’s commitment to Product leadership as a competitive edge, Barco has chosen a niche market of technically superior projectors. This allows Barco, as a performance and product leader, to charge higher prices than the competition. Sony’s surprise introduction of the 1270 is a clear outpacing attack(1) on Barco’s niche market. The 1270 from Sony is considered technically superior and lower priced, compared to Barco’s planned projectors. Traditionally, Barco has segmented the market for its products on the basis of the scan rate of projectors into three main segments: video, data and graphics. Sony is trying to overcome this segmentation by addressing the data and graphics with one superior product (1270). Barco now has to deal with the following issue: Sony will launch a superior product, forcing Barco out of its technical leadership, and......

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Arck Systems Case Study

...Arck Systems Case Study Introduction This paper will discuss how an optimal sales system should be implemented by Arck Systems through analyzing the changes incorporated by Bryan Mynor for the recently acquired Lux Software’s sales force’s compensation plan. We will begin with an overview of the major issues Arck Systems faced when assessing how the company should modify the plan. An examination of Arck Systems and Lux Software Inc.’s current compensation plans as well as the benefits and disadvantages of making changes to those compensation plans will then be introduced. Next, our recommendation for Arck Systems to create one unified compensation plan for both sales forces will be discussed, stressing the importance of a meticulous implementation of well-defined multiple customer value source plan into Arck Systems’ business strategy. Finally, we will conclude the paper by briefly reiterating the key details of the case, our analysis and recommendation. Background: Arck Systems and Lux Software Inc.’s Compensation Plans Arck Systems acquired Lux Software Inc., who enjoyed faster growth and higher margins, in an effort to grow market share through the expected synergies the two companies would experience once completely integrated. The acquisition resulted in Lux’s EVP of Sales, Chris Snyder, leaving the company. Snyder also recruited most of his sales management team with him leaving only Lux’s key salespeople. Bryan Mynor, EVP of......

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Arck System

...comes to know of his son's kidnapping. Kidnapping is an act of rupturing and breaking the social. Rather than the recognition of mutual vulnerability and shared precariousness, kidnapping reduces the social to the ability to inflict harm, and the need to protect the body from harm. Harming and protecting are acts of creating boundaries, and the politics of the body once again becomes trapped in the discourse of autonomy and sovereignty. But breaking down is an overflow of the body, a transgression of the boundary, a sign of vulnerability, a sign of the self traveling beyond the boundary of the body. To break down, to cry is to show discontent. Tears are an uncomfortable challenge to the organisation of rationality (Sosa, 2009). The rational system has not calculated for tears, it does not know how to deal with them. Tears are messy, they cannot be part of the rational process of enacting society and organisation. Tears need to be ignored. The practice of kidnapping should not be allowed to crumble due to the incursions made by the subject who cries. Abductions continue after escape as a refugee as well. A Tibetan refugee living in India described how he fled Tibet as he feared for his life, ‘My father had been jailed by the Chinese for 9 years. Then they killed him in the jail itself. My mother told me, leave Tibet and go to a foreign country. If you remain here, you will also be killed one day … My mother and sister stayed back. My mother has died now. Only my sister......

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Arcks Systems

...Directors realised that it was high time for them to have a fully functional and dedicated HR department. Ms Milas was brought in as the senior manager HR. Although, Milas has no previous experience in the chemical industry, she possessed adequate IR and HR experience in the manufacturing sector. After her initial adaptation with the organisation, processes, and structure she was confronted with some deep-rooted HR issues within the organisation. She made her attempts to address them from within, she also realised that there was a huge amount of resistance from the middle and senior management with regards to any changes that she suggested. After 2 years of diagnosis, Milas suggested to the management that it was time that brought in better systems, structure and methods to all QSDPL processes. That is how Eskays Consulting Group was brought in “You have to understand that ours is an organisation that has grown due to its market operations. Numbers have always been the key parameter for success. Even to date, sales takes priority over any other function. At the same time, the 3 Directors belonged to Sales, Production and R&D respectively. Hence, there was very little focus on the strategies and intervention that were required to set up the HR issues. There is very little HR in the organisation. Even to date, the appraisals, recruitment and grievance handling is typically done by the functional heads” “Apart from this, one of the major areas of concern is the......

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Case Study Management Control System

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Management Control System Case Study

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Case Study on Tate and Lyle; Management Information System.

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Sun Micro Systems Case Study

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Fedex Case Study Information System

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