Sharkas Ektor Dissertation

Research Team Biographies
 
Kim Holland, PhD
My interest is in the physiological ecology of marine organisms and in the interface between animal behavior and physiology. In researching these topics, I try to combine laboratory and fieldwork methods to address the questions at hand. Recently, this has taken the form of tracking the movements of pelagic and nearshore fishes and trying to relate their diel movements, home range sizes and swimming strategies to their foraging success and energy budgets. This research also has resource management ramifications. Originally trained as a chemosensory physiologist, I maintain an interest in this field.
Visit my shark lab website
 
Carl Meyer, PhD, FIBiol
My current research focuses on the ecology and management of sharks and reef fishes. I’m interested in the movement patterns, habitat use and trophic ecology of sharks and fishes, and the navigational abilities of sharks. My research addresses a variety of issues of management concern including impacts of shark ecotourism, shark predation on critically endangered species, effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and impacts of human recreational activities in MPAs.
Visit my faculty page
 
Yannis Papastamatiou, PhD
I am interested in the relationships between movement patterns, foraging ecology, and physiological ecology of elasmobranchs and other fishes. I utilize traditional telemetry techniques (acoustic and satellite), as well as novel "ecological" tags. These are data-loggers that record physiological and behavioral measurements to determine more specifically what an animal is doing (e.g. feeding, hunting, digesting). I am also interested in the ecology of predators on mesophotic reefs (50-100 m depth) and the utilization of technical dive techniques to study deeper reefs. I'm currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Florida Museum of Natural History.
 
 
Nick Whitney, PhD
Nick completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2009. His dissertation work focused on movements, reproductive behavior and population genetics of the whitetip reef shark, Triaenodon obesus. Nick is now a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Lab. Nick's work is focused on quantifying fine-scale aspects of shark behavioral ecology using accelerometers and other data-logging tags.
Read more about Nicks research at Mote
 
Tim Clark, PhD
Tim completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2010. His dissertation work focuses on the population structure, habitat use, and feeding ecology of the manta ray, Manta birostris. Tim is now a marine ecologist with theNational Park of American Samoa.
 
 
Jon Dale
Jon completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2011. His dissertation work focused on the ecology and life history of the brown stingray, Dasyatis lata. Jon is now a postdoctoral scholar at the Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University.
 
Melanie Hutchinson
I am interested in shark population biology and ecology and the impacts that fisheries have on pelagic shark populations. For my thesis research I am testing different strategies to mitigate shark bycatch in high seas and coastal fisheries. To do this I am exploiting the electrosensory apparatus of sharks and looking at the effects of electropositive metals on their behavior and catch rates.
Visit my UH Zoology Department page.
 
Tom Tinhan
I was a research technician in the shark lab at Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, where I assisted with shark fishing, the deployment of telemetry and ecology tags, and the feeding and husbandry of captive animals. I am interested in using telemetry techniques to monitor the movements of fisheries target species in relation to polluted coastal waters. I'm now working on my Master's degree in the Shark Lab at California State University at Long Beach.
 
 
Christian Clark
I was a research technician in the shark lab at Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, where I assisted with shark fishing, the deployment of telemetry and ecology tags, and the deployment and recovery of underwater receivers. I graduated from the University of Hawaii Manoa with a B.S. in Global Environmental Science in 2010 and am currently a Rolex Underwater Scholar.
 
 

 


The Entomological Collection, which includes all groups of insects from all parts of the world, with over 450.000 specimens, is one of the richest and museologically best processed collections at Natural History Museum. Since the establishment in 1895, although at uneven rate, the collection is steadily increasing, primarily due to curators’ activities but also due to donations of entomologists both from this country and from abroad. There is also the precious contribution by numerous friends who took various journeys. Although these are usually just single insects, they are often from exotic regions. The whole fund includes 51 collections: General collection of insects, Collection of insects by Petar Novak, Collection of insects by Institute for Conservation of Plants, the Historical collection of Odonata, Collection of Odonata by Živko Adamović, General collection of Odonata, General collection of Orthoptera, Collection of Orthoptera by Borivoj Lazarević, Collection of Homoptera, Collection of Homoptera: Auchenorhyncha by Ljubodrag Janković, Initial collection of Heteroptera, Collection of Heteroptera by Nikola Kormiljev, the Study collection of Heteroptera, Collection of Heteroptera on cultivated plants, Collection of Thysanoptera on cultivated plants, Study collection of Thysanoptera, Donated Collection of Thysanoptera by Gabor Jenser, Collection of Thysanoptera by Richard zur Strassen, Collection of Neuroptera, Collection of Coleoptera by Nedeljko Košanin, General collection of Coleoptera, Collection of Coleoptera: Cicindelidae, Collection of Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Collection of Coleoptera: Scarabeidae, Collection of Coleoptera by Ljubodrag Janković, Collection of Coleoptera from the vicinity of Skopje by S. Vojinović, Collection of Coleoptera by Stjepan Svirčev, Collection of Coleoptera by Jovan Stančić, Collection of Coleoptera by Guido Nonveiller, Collection of Lepidoptera by Miloš Rogulja, General collection of Rhopalocera, Collection of Rhopalocera from Durmitor by Predrag Jakšić, General collection of Heterocera, Collection of butterflies by Archibald Reiss, Collection of butterflies by Boško Salamon, Collection of butterflies by Ivo Toševski, Collection of butterflies of India by Andraš Galac, Collection of African butterflies, Collection of butterflies of South America, Collection of Diptera, Collection of Diptera : Tipuloidea, Collection of Diptera: Asilidae, Collection of Diptera: Syrphidae by Slobodan Glumac, Collection of Diptera: Syrphidae by Smiljka Šimić and Ante Vujić, Collection of Diptera: Tachinidae by Pelagija Sisojević, Collection of Diptera: Nycteribia, bat parasites, General collection of Hymenoptera, General collection of Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea, Collection of Hymenoptera: Apidae by Simeun Grozdanić, Collection of Hymenoptera: Apidae by Živomir Vasić, Collection of Hymenoptera: Apoidea by Zoran Mučalica, Herbarium cecidologicum by Duška Simova. The oldest specimens are from the second half of XIX century, while the Collection of Coleoptera by Nedeljko Košanin is one of the oldest. The greatest number of specimens is in the Collections of: dragonflies (Odonata), grasshoppers (Orthoptera), crickets (Homoptera), heteropterans (Heteroptera), thrips (Thysanoptera), flies (Diptera), butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera), beetles (Coleoptera) and hymenopterans (Hymenoptera). The entomological boxes are used to store the specimens of thousands of species, from those known to everybody to the particularly rare ones which would be welcomed into their collection by every museum in the world. The Entomological Collection of Natural History Museum is therefore indispensable for knowing the history of studies on insects and their diversity in the area of Serbia and Balkans. It would be impossible to perform any serious research and studies in fields of taxonomy, faunistics, ecology, biogeography and conservation of insects without the data from Entomological collection of Natural History Museum. Specimens from other continents: Africa, Asia and South America, are particularly interesting for needs of exhibitions.

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